ADSENSE

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Welcome to Emmaxy's Blog: We are not ashamed to be called the church of the ...

Welcome to Emmaxy's Blog: We are not ashamed to be called the church of the ...: Welcome to Linda Ikeji's Blog: We are not ashamed to be called the church of the ... : The Founder of Living Faith Church aka Winners Ch...

K1 releases new album, calls It State of the Nation

Welcome to Linda Ikeji's Blog: K1 releases new album, calls It State of the Natio...: Fuji music icon, the irrepressible Alhaji Wasiu Ayinde Marshall a.k.a. K-1 De Ultimate, is at it once again. He has just dropped yet ano...

We are not ashamed to be called the church of the Rich

Welcome to Linda Ikeji's Blog: We are not ashamed to be called the church of the ...: The Founder of Living Faith Church aka Winners Chapel, Bishop David Oyedepo, in an interview with Saturday Punch said the reason there ar...

Welcome to Linda Ikeji's Blog: 2face rocks N1million gold encrusted sneakers at T.W.O

2face rocks N1million gold encrusted sneakers at T.W.O. 2Face was seen wearing a customized gold encrusted Versace sneakers worth N1million, during the video shoot of music giants, Tunde and Wu...

Thursday, May 22, 2014

INTRODUCING WEALTH

Like everything else on FaceBook, & YouTube this is already growing like crazy. Tons of FaceBook & YouTube members are making extra money simply by sharing YouTube videos with their friends. Join this application before all of your friends get ahead of you! Click here to get started: http://uvioo.com/video/?m=Emmanuel50 Have fun!
Like everything else on FaceBook, & YouTube this is already growing like crazy. Tons of FaceBook & YouTube members are making extra money simply by sharing YouTube videos with their friends. Join this application before all of your friends get ahead of you! Click here to get started: http://uvioo.com/video/?m=Emmanuel50 Have fun!

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Welcome to Emmaxy's Blog: HEY! NEW OPPORTUNITY

Welcome to Emmaxy's Blog: HEY! NEW OPPORTUNITY: Are you Broke?. There is a New Website that pays in Naira[#} for a little Job. Click this Link: http://www.500naira.com/index.php?ref=emmayo...

HEY! NEW OPPORTUNITY

Are you Broke?. There is a New Website that pays in Naira[#} for a little Job. Click this Link: http://www.500naira.com/index.php?ref=emmayo.

HEY! NEW OPPORTUNITY

Are you Broke?. There is a New Website that pays in Naira[#} for a little Job. Click this Link: http://www.500naira.com/index. php?ref=emmayo.

Monday, May 12, 2014

FAREWELL: RIO FERDINAND

Rio Ferdinand is set to leave Manchester United after being informed he will not be offered a new contract. “I have thought long and hard over the last few months about my future, and after 12 fantastic years playing, for what I regard, as the best club in the world, I have decided the time is right for me to move on," the 35-year-old told his website,5mag. "I joined Manchester United in the hope of winning trophies, and never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined how successful we would be during my time here. There have been so many highlights, playing alongside some great players who have become good friends, winning my first Premier League title and also that fantastic night in Moscow are memories that I will cherish forever. "Circumstances didn’t allow for me to say goodbye the way I would have liked but I’d like to take this opportunity to thank my team-mates, staff, the club & the fans for an unbelievable 12 yrs that I’ll never forget. Winning trophies I dreamed about as a kid came true at this great club. "I am feeling fit and healthy, ready for a new challenge and looking forward to whatever the future holds for me.”

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Chibok schoolgirls’ abduction: We’re scared, we need more protection – Nigerian children

It is been over three weeks since the Islamic sect, Boko Haram, kidnapped over 200 female secondary school students in Chibok, Borno State. Up till now, the girls have not been found. Meanwhile, the issue has continued to generate wide condemnations, both locally and internationally.Saturday PUNCHwent to the streets to get the reactions of young students. Some of the girls could be their parents only children Adamu Rahmat, 15 What Boko Haram has done by kidnapping fellow students is not right. It is really painful because the students were supposed to be writing their exams. The kidnappers are very heartless because they don’t care what the parents would be going through. It appears that the Boko Haram sect members don’t have human feelings. Some people say that politicians are involved but we don’t really know, so I will advise the government to intensify its rescue efforts. I will urge the kidnappers to release the girls; some of the girls could be their parents’ only children or only daughters. Kidnapping students is very bad Mohammed Abu, 15 I don’t think the insurgency will spread to the states it hasn’t got to already, like Lagos, because it’s been going on for a while now and they have restricted it to the north and Abuja. What they have done is really bad because the students had nothing to do with them, so why kidnap them? The insurgents have their own children, how would they feel if some people kidnapped their children too? Government should strengthen the military to stop all the violence.

Nigeria’s satellites cannot track Chibok girls, insurgents –Muhammed, NASRDA boss

Director General, National Space Research Development Agency, Prof. Seidu Muhammed in this interview with EVEREST AMAEFULE,addresses talks about the activities of the agency and why its satellites can’t track Chibok girls It is now 11 years since Nigeria launched an earth observation satellite – the NigeriaSat-1. How do you assess the odyssey to the space? In the last 12 years, the space agency has given a good account of itself. From a humble beginning of only a national centre of remote sensing, with emphasis on capacity building; today, we have established other centres of excellence. One is a centre where we design and build satellites. Number two is a centre for geodesy and geodynamics which today prides itself as the most reliable centre supplying coastal information from the African continent. We have just finished the first four years of collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and we have just renewed our collaboration for another four years which will be on till 2018. We also have a centre for space technology education and because of our prominence at the committee on peaceful uses of outer space, it now doubles as a centre for space technology education for English speaking Africa domiciled at the Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile Ife. I am happy to say that both long term and short term courses run at the centre having over 300 Africans.

Osaze, Agbim and their nine lives

Finally, the Super Eagles list for the 2014 FIFA World Cup holding in Brazil was made public on Tuesday. The release put to rest all the arguments, false lists and pressures tied around the list. And many of these were not really necessary as Nigeria’s list became something extraordinary compared to the other 31 countries billed for the 2014 World Cup. Before Stephen Keshi and officials of the Nigeria Football Federation released the list, I had imagined that it was only the cat that had nine lives going by what humans have always said about the feline. But after going through the provisional squad for Brazil I have come to realise that some players can also boast of nine lives. Chigozie Agbim, Osaze Odemwingie and Joseph Yobo certainly have nine football lives but I don’t know how many one can count for Ikechukwu Uche. These four players, I understand, were the major issue when Keshi presented the original provisional list to the NFF. The Technical Committee members were not too sure if Yobo was still needed but they were adamant that the coach could get another goalkeeper from the Nigerian league who could replace Agbim. The indices used were very clear. They spoke on the keeper’s performance in South Africa during CHAN earlier this year; they were also not comfortable that a number one goalkeeper of the home-based Eagles could not tie down the number one shirt in Rangers. The fear was that anything could happen in Brazil and suddenly the third choice goalkeeper could then become number one. I share this fear with them. Agbim didn’t impress in South Africa but I must admit that I have not watched him in action in the local league or elsewhere since then. Some people have argued that he has overcome the stage fright and could do better with a fresh challenge. I wait to be convinced on that. As for Yobo, I doubt if he can stand the heat of the World Cup even though this is just a provisional list. I wish he was used so long ago for the friendlies so that he could have cooled off his emotions completing the 100 caps race. A friend of mine has argued several times that the team needs the experience of the defender on the pitch from time to time. If that is what Keshi also thinks of him, then so be it. But if Yobo could miss so many games in the English Premier League due to fitness/injury challenge, then he needs to convince us that he still has a place even in a provisional list.

Friday, May 9, 2014

#BRING BACK OUR GIRLS

The abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls in Nigeria has lead to campaigns calling for their rescue, on social media and offline all around the world. After Nigerian protestors marched on parliamentin the capital Abuja calling for action on April 30, people in cities around the world have followed suit and organised their own marches. A social media campaign under the hashtag #Bringbackourgirls started trending in Nigeria two weeks ago and has now been tweeted more than one million times. It was first used on April 23 at the opening ceremony for a UNESCO event honouring the Nigerian city of Port Harcourt as the 2014 World Book Capital City. A Nigerian lawyer in Abuja, Ibrahim M. Abdullahi, tweeted the call in a speech by Dr. Oby Ezekwesili, Vice President of the World Bank for Africa to "Bring Back the Girls!"

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Summary of The Potter's Wheel

Here is the overall summary of The Potter’s Wheel by Chukwuemeka Ike and The Successors by Jerry Agada as promised in my earlier post on the Two Books in JAMB 2012/2013 Use of English Syllabus JAMB wants you to read.
Please take note that JAMB will not necessarily ask you much about the book than the points embedded in this two books, also take note of the figure of speech / figurative expressions, synonyms and idiomatic expressions contained in this book as they may also use that to test you.

THE POTTER’S WHEEL

By Chukwuemeka Ike
The Potter’s Wheel is a novel that takes us to a village called Umuchukwu in the eastern part of Nigeria, where one of the basic elements of the local idioms is sayings or proverbs, much like a Bible-based community where people communicate through chapters and verses citations. In the story, even the young ones had riddle and proverb contests to see who knew the most. The story was set about the time of the Second World War (1939-1945). In the story, references are frequently made to the ongoing war, which Nigerians, at that time were part of, through conscription or voluntary involvement.
The story centres on Obu, an eight-year-old boy, who, as the only son with five older sisters and one younger sister, had been badly spoiled by his adoring mother. The mother’s reason for her indulgence towards him was simple; it was the boy’s eventual birth that gave her strong footing in her husband’s house, for the husband’s family had compelled him to take another wife who would give them – the family – a male child. In fact, the five female children that were born before Obu had been given names suggestive of the degree of anxiety and faith, with which Mama Obu and her husband had longed for a male child. The name “Uzoamaka”, given to their first female child, means “The road is excellent”; the second, “Nkiru” means “That which is yet to come is greater”; the third, “Njideka” means “Hold what you have”; the fourth, “Nkechi”, means “Whatever God gives”; and the fifth, “Ogechukwu”, means “God’s time is the best”. Besides that, when Obu arrived, he became a cynosure to the parents, the mother particularly, so much so that apart from his first name “Obuechima”, which means “Compound must not revert to bush”, he was given all sorts of endearment names, such as “Ezenwa”, meaning “infant king”, “Nwokenagu”, meaning “A male child is desirable”, “Oyinbo”, meaning “A companion”, and “Obiano”, meaning “Solace”. No other boy came after Obu, but a girl came two years after his birth, and she was named “Amuche”, meaning “No one knows God’s mind”. All these events depict the superstitious nature of the Ibos; how they weave some stories around everything that happens to them.
Obu’s father, Mazi Lazarus Maduabuchi was a successful cloth dealer. He was a kindly man, but fearing for the boy’s future in the hands of his over doting mother, he sent him off to be a servant of a weird, fearsome couple, Teacher Zaccheus Kanu and Madam Deborah Onuekwucha Kanu, both of whom were childless and lived in Aka, a village, some sixty miles away from Umuchukwu. Mama Obu was vehemently opposed to the seemingly suicidal idea of having her treasured son sent to the house of a “wicked man and the witch he has as wife”, even when her husband proverbially reasoned with her that, “He who does not suffer hardship cannot develop any common sense”. In the end however, her resistance, merely verbal, cut no ice, for she was the one, who even later took Obu to the Teacher’s house in Aka, where the boy was to begin a new life as a servant. This event is symbolic of the prevalent mentality of African parents, fathers specifically, who so much believe, against the stifling fondness of mothers, that some degree of hardship and suffering is very essential in the upbringing of a child, if such child is to be useful to him/herself in the future. Also, the subservience and abject obedience of mothers and wives to their husbands was aptly portrayed by Mama Obu, as such slavish compliance, as far as African traditions are concerned, is crucial to the continued survival of a marriage.
Teacher Zaccheus Kanu’s house, a reformatory home of some sort, sheltered an assortment of other youngsters: Silence (who was 14yrs), Moses, Ada (who was 16, and a cousin to Teacher), Mary (who was a spoilt girl, already engaged to a man but was ‘enrolled’ by the fiancĂ© at Madam’s home, for her to undergo some tutelage in domestic and wifely training), Monday (who was 19, and Madam’s cousin), Bright (whom his father gave out to Teacher in exchange for the money the father was owing Teacher), and Obu, the newest arrival. These children were beaten and abused, and were subjected to slavish lives. For instance, apart from the ‘baptism of fire’ slap that Obu got from Madam, Teacher’s wife, on his first day at Teacher’s house, for talking back at the woman, he also, at another time, was served another deafening smack by the ruthless Madam, because of his careless and wasteful attitude of pouring away the excessively salted pottage that she had asked him to prepare for her. The smack sent him sprawling on the ground and made him dizzy for some time. At some other time, Obu was openly embarrassed and beaten so wickedly on the assembly in his school, by the headmaster, who must have been told by Teacher that Obu stole a piece of meat from the pot at home the previous night.
Expectedly, these children, in their various childish ways, devised different acts of vengeance, to get back at their two oppressors – Teacher and Madam. First of all, they all developed strong flair for lying, as they mostly had to lie to escape from the unwarranted harsh punishment they were endlessly subjected to. Besides, Silence, the very tricky fourteen year old boy, would never answer a call by either Teacher or Madam, the first two successive times. He would neglect the call the first two times, with the hope that if he didn’t answer it, his caller would call someone else. He would answer the call only if it came the third time. Bright was another character. Teacher almost always liked to insultingly remind him that he – Bright – was serving him (Teacher), because of his (Bright’s) father’s debt to him. When once, he gave Bright such humiliating reminder, and even attempted to wipe his oil-soiled hand dry on Bright’s head, the boy, “like a drenched dog…” (pg. 133), “…shook his dripping head vigorously…”, and he let drops of the oily water splash on Teacher’s shirt. Ada was yet another character!
Exasperated by Madam’s unrepentantly cruel behavior towards her and others in the house, Ada once poured on her Madam “…a bowl of dirty water containing cocoyam peels, discarded ora leaves, and a coating of palm oil from the cooking utensils she had washed in the bowl…” (pg. 186). Even after that mischief, Ada stood unremorseful and ready for the consequences of her actions. As the furious Madam punched and hit and smacked Ada, the girl defensively fended off some of the blows and mockingly took some, unwearyingly. Even the bigger punishment from Teacher, which came much later – scrubbing the school latrine every day for one whole week – meant nothing to the girl. She was happy that she had succeeded in cutting her Madam down to size!
The brutalities that abound in the Aka home provoked nostalgic feelings in Obu about his birth place. He had nostalgia about home, through dreams and reminiscences. He was so home-sick that he thought of what seemed to be a foolproof strategy, which was to write a letter in the guise of his mother, to Teacher. In the short letter which he eventually wrote, in Igbo, his impersonated mother said she wanted Obu to come home, to Umuchukwu, to look after his younger sister. What Obu had thought would work against Teacher was so easily faulted by the crafty Teacher. Teacher was nonetheless stunned by the creativity of the boy (for him to have thought of something as ingenious as impersonating his mother!)
After a year of the hellish life Obu had lived in Aka, his father requested that he be allowed to return home for Christmas, and by the time he returned to Umuchukwu, Obu had become so much transformed into a dutiful, hardworking boy. His return sent everywhere agog! He had shed his old habits – he was no more the loafing, bed-wetting, spoilt Obu! However, happy about his eventual rescue from the tortuous Aka life, Obu never wished to return to Teacher’s house. He asked his mother to help him tell his father about his decision, but the mother, understanding how predictably fruitless such effort of hers would be, urged Obu to speak to his father himself. After some long contemplation as to how to tell his father about his decision not to return to Teacher’s house, he finally broached the topic. His father’s compromising response trivialized Obu’s protracted worry, and he (Obu) wished he had said his mind long before he later did. And after Obu’s father’s seeming compromising response, he later called Obu to sit. With some wise cajolery, the silver-tongued father of Obu succeeded in making the boy see the need for him to return to Teacher’s house.
“Nobody who does not suffer can succeed in life. Edmund is what he is because his father forgot yams, forgot cocoyams, forgot meat and sent him to suffer in Teacher’s hands. It was Teacher who made him. Teacher tells me your brain is even hotter than Edmund’s. So, there is no reason why you should not drink tea with the white man and study in the white man’s land. But if you want to be like Caleb, you should come and live with your mother, eating goat meat and drinking palm wine and dancing with masquerades. But when the time comes, don’t say that I did not warn you. You can go.”
After this persuasive talk with his father, Obu himself voluntarily returned to Teacher’s house in January (after the Christmas holiday).
The story ultimately centres (thematically) on the challenges of parenthood. With the constant interplay between the vernacular Igbo and the English language, the author enlightens us on many things: The plight of a ‘maleless’ (without a male child) wife or couple in traditional Igbo or Nigerian society; the concept of Ogbanje (or Abiku) children and the societal attitudes to such children; the richness of traditional values as seen in the prevalently mentioned local food (especially the uncommon ones as fried termites, which were here considered as a treat; and the very common one, kola nuts, which are usually served, as etiquette demands, by hosts to visitors.); local names guarded or prompted by some superstition; local proverbs put to various communicative uses; local beliefs and traditions, etc.
BY AYOBAMI ADEBAYO

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

MY OPINIONS: I’ll sell abducted girls, says B’Haram leader, She...

MY OPINIONS: I’ll sell abducted girls, says B’Haram leader, She...: The terrorist Islamic sect, Boko Haram, on Monday claimed responsibility for the April 14 abduction of over 267 pupils of Government Girls’ ...

I’ll sell abducted girls, says B’Haram leader, Shekau

The terrorist Islamic sect, Boko Haram, on Monday claimed responsibility for the April 14 abduction of over 267 pupils of Government Girls’ Secondary School, Chibok, in Borno State. TheAgence France-Pressequoted the leader of the sect, Abubakar Shekau, as making the claim in a video the agency said it obtained. Shekau, in the video, also threatened to sell off the abducted girls in defiance of international outrage that greeted the kidnapping of the girls from their hostel. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the seizure of the girls barely 24hours after President Goodluck Jonathan told the nation that no group had claimed responsibility for the abduction. Also, the President’s wife, Patience, has expressed doubt about the authenticity of the kidnapping. “We the Nigerian women are saying that no child is missing in Borno State. If any child is missing, let the governor go and look for them. There is nothing we can do again,”Mrs Jonathan told the women who met with her in the Presidential Villa on Monday. But, Shekau was quoted to have said, “I abducted your girls. I will sell them in the market, by Allah.” He spoke just as the Daily Telegraph of London reported that a former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who is now a UN special envoy on education, led calls for Western governments to assist with the rescue of the girls.

Monday, May 5, 2014


Singer Kween Buys Her Husband A Brand New N20M Pontiac Car

Do any of you remember the charming lady that sang ‘Jebele Jebele’??? Well, if you don’t, now you do. Apparently, Kween seems to be doing very well for herself as she just presented a brand new Pontiac car worth 20 million Naira to her husband, Dotun Omotoye of Club Rumours as birthday gift earlier today. Check Photo.

Singer Kween Buys Her Husband A Brand New N20M Pontiac Car

Do any of you remember the charming lady that sang ‘Jebele Jebele’??? Well, if you don’t, now you do. Apparently, Kween seems to be doing very well for herself as she just presented a brand new Pontiac car worth 20 million Naira to her husband, Dotun Omotoye of Club Rumours as birthday gift earlier today. Check Photo.

Singer Kween Buys Her Husband A Brand New N20M Pontiac Car

Do any of you remember the charming lady that sang ‘Jebele Jebele’??? Well, if you don’t, now you do. Apparently, Kween seems to be doing very well for herself as she just presented a brand new Pontiac car worth 20 million Naira to her husband, Dotun Omotoye of Club Rumours as birthday gift earlier today. Check Photo.